Tony Williams Ballet

TEDx Conference with Tony Williams Ballet

Tony Williams Ballet presents Glinka's Pas de Trois by George Balanchine

Tony Williams Ballet at LAUNCH, May 2015

Adult Company 2015

Tony Williams Ballet presents Ben's Trumpet

Tony Williams Ballet Junior & Youth Ensemble

Ultimate Responsive Image Slider Plugin Powered By Weblizar

Check our Upcoming Productions Page for more up-to-date information! In May 2015, Tony Williams introduced his own ballet company to the world by with a special intimate performance in Jamaica Plain.  April 24 saw the reinvigoration of this company with our Spring Works in PROGRESS presented in studio in an intimate setting along with Friends of the company, Marsha Parrilla’s Danza Organica.


The Long Nourishing Exacting Touch of Mr. Balanchine

“This is a living art. We must pass it on.”

As a young boy, Marina’s father contracted tuberculosis. Consumption, as it was then known, was a deadly disease literally consuming the weak, the malnourished, the poor. In post-revolutionary Russia, it had become an epidemic for which there was no cure. The doctor prescribed vigorous exercise to strengthen the body. Among other things, he mentioned ballet.
    marinateaching   marinaalonso
Marina Teaching | Andre Eglevsky & Alicia Alonso in Giselle

Ballet was already an epidemic of its own. By the early 20th century, balletomania had spread to all layers of western society. Polish prodigy Vaslav Nijinsky drew crowds of delirious fans. When she saw him dance, 21-year old Romola de Pulszky broke off her engagement to a Hungarian baron and followed Nijinski on his tour to South America. In Russia, three Grand Dukes, including the future Tsar Nicholas II, courted the prima-ballerina Mathilde Kshessinska. And Anna Pavlova, a humble daughter of a laundress, reigned supreme on stages around the world.

André Eglevsky recovered from his illness, but never from ballet. He attended Madame Kshessinska’s school in Paris. At age 14, he joined a professional company, Ballets Russes De Monte Carlo. Within six months he was dancing the lead parts. One of his tours brought him to America, where he would be called “the greatest dancer of his generation.” Ballets Russes had begun in 1909 as an effort to promote Russian ballet abroad. The original troupe starred Nijinsky, Pavlova, Kshessinska and other crown jewels of the Imperial Ballet. The company also employed the most visionary artists of its time.

Enrico Cecchetti taught his technique. Fokine, Massine, and Balanchine choreographed the ballets. Stravinsky, Prokofiev, Ravel and Debussy wrote the music. Bakst, Roerich, Benois, Chanel, Picasso and Dali designed sets and costumes. It was a constellation of the arts such as the world had never seen. Yet the times were not kind to the artist—nor to the human species as a whole. Ballets Russes alternately destroyed lives and launched careers:

“After Nijinsky had lost his mind, they put him away and gave all of his roles to my father. Fokine personally taught him the steps.”

Another spectacular offshoot of Ballets Russes was George Balanchine. In 1930s Balanchine opened his own ballet school and a performing company. Long before Ballets Russes de Monte Carlo finally folded in 1968, many of its dancers and staff had migrated to New York City to work for Balanchine. André Eglevsky among them.

It is no accident that the gods of dance favored Balanchine. He proved to be their most devoted servant. He continued to create new experimental technically, musically, and artistically challenging works until his death in 1983. His company, New York City Ballet, still holds the largest repertoire of any ballet company in America.
marinabalstrav
Balanchine and Stravinsky circa 1953
Balanchine’s character was as unusual as his artistic signature. He was generous, loyal and broad-minded in a world full of rivalry, treachery and melodrama. While the old Ballets Russes routinely dismissed married dancers,  Balanchine was friendly to young families. With both of her parents in the company, Marina grew up in his studios.
marinaandre
Marina and André Eglevsky
 “I learned to dance at the same time I learned to walk. I had no business being in the same class with my parents, but Mr. Balanchine used to let me in. I hung around after the class and watched him choreograph dances ‘on’ my father.”
Balanchine was not jealous or possessive. He encouraged his students to start their own companies and schools. When André Eglevsky retired from dancing, Balanchine gave his blessing to open a ballet school on Long Island. He also gave Eglevsky the rights to many of his ballets.

Today, the works Balanchine had bequeathed to her father are in Marina’s care. Which is how it happened that one Sunday afternoon she showed up at Tony Williams dance studios in Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts.

Tony and Marina had met before:
“When I arrived in Royal Winnipeg Ballet with my husband, Salvatore Aiello, Tony was there. He danced a lot with his partner at the time, Bonnie Wyckoff, and my husband and I danced a lot together. So we were two couples one could say competing, but I never felt this way. Bonnie and Tony were great dancers and artists and instead of competing I felt a great admiration for them, I was excited to learn from them and I looked forward to dancing with Tony myself, which I did on occasion. It was always a great joy to dance with Tony.”

After the Royal Winnipeg, Tony and Marina went their separate ways. Now she’s back in his life to help stage one of Balanchine’s works—Glinka pas-des-trois. The ballet premiered in 1955 with André Eglevsky, Allegra Kent, and Melissa Hayden. It has since been danced by the finest ballet companies of the world.

marinastaging
Marina Eglevsky staging at Bolshoi
So, why Tony? Why now?
“Because he needs it. He wants to build a company and expand beyond the Nutcracker. These ballets are great to train dancers and to attract audiences. You can’t go wrong with Balanchine.”
It’s a generous gesture, deserving of the Master himself. Balanchine has helped more than one company get off the ground. Without him, there would be no Boston Ballet. Balanchine noticed the works of a struggling Boston choreographer E. Virginia Williams and offered to personally coach her at New York City Ballet. In 1963, he
recommended Williams’ company for a $144,000 grant from the Ford Foundation— and Boston Ballet was born.
Now it’s Tony’s turn. Tony Williams Ballet is rehearsing Glinka and will perform it this summer in Boston.  Balanchine’s life-giving touch now comes through Marina Eglevsky. Her job is to adapt the choreography to the current technique and to teach the dancers the intention of the steps. It’s painstaking work, but Marina asks for nothing better:
“I have done these ballets since I was 12. Glinka being one. My father first taught me how to dance them. Then he taught me how to stage them. They are a work of a genius, like Mozart or Beethoven. They are eternally creative and they keep opening up to understanding and to being developed. I have done it for half of my life and I never get tired of it. I am madly in love with it.”
The ballets are difficult to learn and to perform. They require stamina, correctness, and expression. They require courage to reveal your deepest self. Mr. B liked to see abandonment in his dancers. Marina is there for those willing to give it a try:
“Balanchine didn’t want his ballets to sit on a shelf. He wanted them to be danced… Once the ballet is staged, I love cleaning it up and inspiring the dancers.”—and Tony, especially:
“Coming to Boston was a great reunion. Tony is doing important work, and it’s wonderful to see what he has created in Boston. I hope to come back and support him in the future.”Marina keeps all the staged versions of the ballets on film—all the way back to the black-and-white videos her mother shot from back-stage. She also has the notations from Balanchine, her father, and herself. But she always works in person. Like a monastic tradition, the ballets are to be passed directly from master to disciple. Through the lineage comes the power of the dance to create the dancer to recreate the dance… “This is a living art. We must pass it on.”

 

buy tickets

Blog article by: Olga Cannistraro
April 22, 2016 | Boston


Chobee Hoy Associates Real Estate has stepped up and awarded the Tony Williams Ballet a $3,000 matching grant to our apprenticeship program!

This means that if you were to  donate, $1, Chobee Hoy would match it up to $3,000! It’s a wonderful opportunity for us to fund our essential program. All donations are handled by our fiscal sponsor at the Boston Dance Alliance and are tax-deductible.   The apprenticeship program is a vital part of the Tony Williams Ballet. Through the program, we have the opportunity to award an underserved diverse age-group (early teens) the opportunity to build upon a promising youth dancing experience, giving them a chance to consider a career in dance. Scholarships of course make this so much easier. Giving the gift of an arts education is an incredibly impactful consideration (just ask our founder, Tony Willliams!)
 Take note that arts funding of the 13-18 year old demographic is shockingly low and we must pursue other avenues of revenue. If you choose to donate, you will do so through the Boston Dance Alliance website where you will choose Tony Williams Dance Center through the drop-down menu.   Thanks for your support!

En Español:

En Mayo de 2015, Tony Williams presentó su propia compañía de ballet al mundo con una representación especial y intima en Jamaica Plain. El 24 de abril marca el resurgimiento de esta compañía con nuestra Spring Works en progreso que presentamos en un escenario intimo con una amiga de la compañía, la Danza Organica, establecido por la bailarín puertorriqueña, Marsha Parrilla.

The Long Nourishing Exacting Touch of Mr. Balanchine

“This is a living art. We must pass it on”

Como un jovén, el padre de Marina contrajo tuberculosis. La consunción, como fue entonces conocido, era una enfermedad que consumía el los débiles, los malqueridos y los pobres. En Rusia pos-revolucionaria, se había convertido en una epidemia por lo cual no había una cura. El doctor prescribió ejercicio ardoroso para fortalecerse el cuerpo. Entre otras cosas, mencionó ballet.

marinateachingmarinaalonso

a la izquierda: Marina enseñando | a la derecha: Andre Eglevesky y Alicia Alonso en Giselle

Ballet fue considerado una epidemia en su propio. Por el principio del siglo veinte, balletomania se había extendido a todas partes de la sociedad occidental. El prodigio polaco Vaclav Nijinsky atrajo un multitud de aficionados delirantes. Cuando lo vio bailar, Romola Pulszky a 21 años terminó su compromiso a un barón húngaro y siguió Nijinsky en su paseo de America del Sur. En Rusia, tres gran duques, incluyendo el futuro zar Nicholas II, fueron novios de la prima-ballerina, Mathilde Kshessinska. Y Anna Pavlova, la hija modesta de una lavandera, reinó supremo en escenarios por todo el mundo.

André Eglevsky recubrió de su enfermedad, pero nunca de ballet. Asistió a la escuela de Madame Kshessinska en Paris. A 14 años, juntó una compañía profesional, se llamó Ballets Russes de Monte Carlo. Entre de seis meses, estaba bailando partes principales. Uno de paseos le trajó a America, dónde se volvería ser llamado “lo mejor bailarín de su generación”. Ballet Russes había empezado en el año 1909 como un esfuerzo para promover el ballet ruso al extranjero. La compañía original protagonizó a Nijinsky, Pavlova, Kshessinska, y otras joyas del ballet imperial. También, la compañía empleaba las artistas más visionarias de su época.

Enrico Cecchetti enseñaba su tecnica. Fokine, Massine y Balanchine coreografían los balletes. Stravinsky, Prokofiev, Ravel y Debussy escribían la música. Bakst, Roerich, Benois, Chanel, Picasso y Dali designaron los escenarios y los costumbres. Fue una constelación de los artes que el mundo nunca había visto. Pero los tiempos no estuvieron amable a la artista, ni a la mayoría de la población humana. Ballet Russes simultáneamente destruía las vidas y lanzaba las carreras:

“After Nijinsky had lost his mind, they put him away and gave all of his roles to my father. Fokine personally taught him the steps.”

Traducción: Después de que Nijinsky se había perdido la mente, le encerraron y dieron todas de sus papeles a mi padre. Fokine le enseñó los pasos personalmente.

Otro producto espectacular de Ballets Russes fue George Balanchine. En los años treinta, Balanchine abrió su propia escuela de ballet y compañía de representación. Mucho tiempo antes de que Ballets Russes de Monte Carlo colapsó por fin en 1968, muchos de sus bailarines y miembros de empleados habían migrado a la cuidad de Nueva York para trabajar por Balanchine, y entre de ellos fue André Eglevsky.

No es un accidente que los dios de la danza favorecían a Balanchine. Se probaba ser su sirviente más leal. Se continuaba crear nuevas obras que eran experimentas técnicas, músicas y artísticas hasta que su muerte en 1983. Su compañía, se llamó el New York City Ballet, todavía alberga el repertoire más grande de cualquier compañía de ballet en America.

marinabalstrav

La fotografía: Balanchine y Stravinsky hacia el año 1953.

El carácter de Balanchine era tan unusual como su firma artística. Era un hombre generoso, leal, y de mente abierta inmerso en un mundo lleno de rivalidad, traición y melodrama. Mientras el viejo Ballets Russes despedía a bailarines casados rutinariamente, Balanchine daba la bienvenida a familias jóvenes. Con ambos de sus padres en la compañía, Marina se crecía en los estudios.

marinaandre

La fotografía: Marina y André Eglevsky

“I learned to dance at the same time I learned to walk. I had no business being in the same class with my parents, but Mr. Balanchine used to let me in. I hung around after the class and watched him choreograph dances ‘on’ my father.” 

Traducción: Aprendí a bailar al mismo tiempo que aprendí a andar. No fui quién para estar en la misma clase de mis padres, pero señor Balanchine usaba permitirme entrar. Me quedaba después de la clase y lo miraba coreografíar bailes ‘en’ mi padre. 

Balanchine no estaba celoso o posesivo. Animaba que sus estudiantes empezaran sus propias compañías y escuelas. Cuando André Eglevsky se jubiló de bailar, Balanchine le dio su bendición para abrir una escuela de ballet en Long Island. Además, dio a Eglevsky los derechos a muchos de sus ballets.

Hoy en día, las obras que Balanchine había legado a su padre se quedan en los manos de Marina, lo cual explica por qué apareció un domingo por la tarde al estudio de Tony Williams en Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts.

Tony y Maria se habían conocido antes:

“When I arrived in Royal Winnipeg Ballet with my husband, Salvatore Aiello, Tony was there. He danced a lot with his partner at the time, Bonnie Wyckoff, and my husband and I danced a lot together. So we were two couples one could say competing, but I never felt this way. Bonnie and Tony were great dancers and artists and instead of competing I felt a great admiration for them, I was excited to learn from them and I looked forward to dancing with Tony myself, which I did on occasion. It was always a great joy to dance with Tony.”

Traducción: Cuando llegué en el Royal Winnipeg Ballet con mi esposo, Salvator Aiello, Tony estaba allí. Bailaba mucho con su compañera al tiempo, Bonnie Wyckoff, y mi esposo y yo bailábamos mucho junto. Así que estábamos dos parejas que estaban competiendo, pero nunca me sentí de esta manera. Bonnie y Tony eran gran bailarines y en vez de competiendo con ellos, me sentí una gran admiración para ellos, estaba emocionada aprender y ansiaba bailar con Tony mi misma, lo cual hice de vez en cuando. Siempre era una gran alegría bailar con Tony.

Después del Royal Winnipeg, Tony y Marina se separaron. Ahora, sin embargo, ella ha vuelto en su vida otra vez para ayudar a representar una de las obras de Balanchine— Glinka pas-de-trois. El ballet se estrenó en 1955 con André Eglevsky, Allegra Kent, y Melissa Hayden. Desde entonces, lo ha estado bailado por las compañías más finas del mundo.

marinastaging

La fotografía: Marina Eglevsky representando a Bolshoi

Entonces,¿por qué Tony? ¿Por qué ahora?

“Because he needs it. He wants to build a company and expand beyond the Nutcracker. These ballets are great to train dancers and to attract audiences. You can’t go wrong with Balanchine.”

Traducción: Porque lo necesita. Él quiere construir una compañía y expandir más allá del Nutcracker. Estos ballets son gran para entrenar a los bailarines y atraer a las audiencias. No puedes equivocarte con Balanchine.

Es un gesto generoso, meritorio del maestro si mismo. Balanchine ha ayudado más que una compañía empece. Sin él, no habría un Boston Ballet. Balanchine notó las obras de un coreógrafo de Boston en apuros, E. Virginia Williams y ofreció a entrenarla personalmente al New York City Ballet. En 1963, recomendó la compañía de Williams por una beca de $144,000 de la Ford Foundation— y de esto el Boston Ballet fue nacido.

Ahora es el giro de Tony. El Tony Williams Ballet está ensayando Glinka y lo representará este verano en Boston. La toca de Balanchine que da vida ahora se nota por Marina Eglevsky. Su trabajo es adaptar la coreografía a la técnica actual y enseñar a los bailarines la intención de los pasos. Es trabajo ardoroso, pero Marina no pide por nada mejor:

“I have done these ballets since I was 12. Glinka being one. My father first taught me how to dance them. Then he taught me how to stage them. They are the work of a genius, like Mozart or Beethoven. They are eternally creative and they keep opening up to understanding and to being developed. I have done it for half of my life and I never get tired of it. I am madly in love with it.”

Traducción: Yo he hecho estas ballets desde que tenía 12 años, y Glinka era uno de ellos. Mi padre me enseñaba cómo bailarlos. Entonces, me enseñaba cómo representarlos. Eran el trabajo de un genio, como Mozart o Beethoven. Son eternamente creativos y siguen abriendo a un entendimiento y un desarrollo. Yo lo he hecho por la mitad de mi vida y nunca estoy harta de él. Estoy locamente enamorado de él.

Los ballets son difíciles para aprender y representar. Requieren aguante, corrección, y expresión. Requieren el valor para revelar si mismo más profundo. Señor B le gustaba ver el abandono entre su bailarines. Marina está aquí por los quién están dispuestos a tratarlo:

“Balanchine didn’t want his ballets to sit on a shelf. He wanted them to be danced… Once the ballet is staged, I love cleaning it up and inspiring the dancers.”—and Tony, especially:

“Coming to Boston was a great reunion. Tony is doing important work, and it’s wonderful to see what he has created in Boston. I hope to come back and support him in the future.”

Traducción: Balanchine no quería que sus ballets se sienten en un estante. Quería que estuvieron bailado… Cuando el ballet fue bailado, me encanta aseándolo y inspirando los bailarines— y Tony, especialmente:

Viniendo a Boston fue un gran reunión. Tony está haciendo trabajo importante, y es maravilloso ver lo que ha creado en Boston. Espero regresar y apoyarlo en el futuro.

Marina mantiene todas las versiones representados del ballet en film— todo el camino de regreso a los filmes que su madre sacaba de ella entre bastidores. Ella tiene además las notaciones de Balanchine, su padre y si misma. Pero también tiene las obras de carne y hueso. Como la tradición monástica, los ballets deben estar pasado a la próxima generación de maestro a discípulo. Por la línea viene el poder del baile para crear el baile…“This is a living art. We must pass it on.” Traducción: Esto es un arte en vivo. Debemos pasarlo.

¡Chobee Hoy Associates Real Estate ha mostrado su apoyo y dado el Tony Williams Ballet una beca correspondiente de $3,000 a nuestro programa de aprendiz!  

Esto quiere decir que si estuviera donar $1, ¡Chobee Hoy lo emparejaría con $3,000! Es una oportunidad maravillosa para nosotros a financiar nuestro programa esencial. Todas las donaciones se manejan por nuestro patrocinador fiscal a la Boston Dance Alliance y son desgravables. Este programa de aprendiz es una parte integral del Tony Williams Ballet. Por el programa, tenemos la habilidad a dar premios a un grupo de edad meritorio y diverso (los adolescentes jóvenes) la oportunidad a basarse en una experiencia prometedora, dándolos la oportunidad a considerar una carrera en el baile. Las escolaridades, por supuesto, hacen esta experiencia mucha más fácil. Dando el regalo de una educación en los artes es una consideración muy impactante (¡pregunta nuestro fundador, Tony Williams!).

Nota que la financiamento de los artes de los adolescentes entre 13 y 18 años es asombrosamente bajo y debemos perseguir otras avenidas de ingresos. Si escoge donar, lo haga por el sitio de web de Boston Ballet Alliance (Boston Dance Alliance), dónde seleccionar el Tony Williams Dance Center por el menú despegable. ¡Gracias por su apoyo!